Complete Guide to Dust Collection Compliance: Meeting Regulatory Requirements and Ensuring Workplace Safety

Meeting Regulatory Requirements and Ensuring Workplace Safety

Contents

Introduction: The Importance of Dust Collection Compliance

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Regulations

OSHA’s Combustible Dust National Emphasis Program (NEP)

Understanding Combustible Dust Hazards

National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standards

Dust Hazard Analysis (DHA): Identifying and Mitigating Risks

Designing Dust Collection Systems for Compliance

Emissions Monitoring and Reporting Requirements

Compliance Audits and Inspections

Training and Employee Awareness

Best Practices for Maintenance and Housekeeping

Industry-Specific Compliance Considerations

Introduction: The Importance of Dust Collection Compliance

Maintaining a safe and healthy workplace environment is a top priority for any business, and for industrial facilities, effective dust collection is a critical component. Not only does proper dust collection help protect workers from respiratory hazards and potential dust explosions, it also ensures compliance with regulatory requirements.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) and other government organizations set standards and guidelines to safeguard employees and minimize the risks associated with airborne particulates.

In this guide, we will explore the key aspects of dust collection compliance, covering everything from OSHA regulations to combustible dust hazards, design considerations, emissions monitoring, and more. By understanding and adhering to these essential requirements, businesses can create a safer working environment, mitigate potential hazards, and maintain regulatory compliance.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Regulations

OSHA regulations apply to most private sector employers and their workers. Formed as a result of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, OSHA’s mandate is to ensure safe and healthy working conditions. If you are located in the US, it is likely that your facility is subject to OSHA standards.

OSHA provides guidance documents, fact sheets, and publications to help you understand and comply with their regulations. You can find these by searching the OSHA website. While you should be familiar with all OSHA requirements (consult your site EH&S expert), here are some key OSHA standards and regulations that are relevant for dust collection and control:

  1. General Duty Clause: The General Duty Clause (Section 5(a)(1) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act) requires employers to provide a workplace free from recognized hazards that can cause serious harm or death. This clause serves as a broad requirement for employers to address dust hazards and implement effective dust control measures.
  2. Respiratory Protection: OSHA’s Respiratory Protection Standard (29 CFR 1910.134) establishes requirements for the use of respiratory protection when employees are exposed to dust that exceeds permissible exposure limits. It includes guidelines for selecting, fitting, and training employees on the use of respiratory protection equipment.
  3. Hazard Communication: OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) requires employers to properly identify and communicate the hazards associated with dust and ensure that employees are trained on the safe handling, storage, and disposal of hazardous substances.
  4. Walking-Working Surfaces: OSHA’s Walking-Working Surfaces Standard (29 CFR 1910 Subpart D) includes requirements for maintaining clean and safe working surfaces, free from accumulations of dust or debris that could create slip and fall hazards.
  5. Electrical Safety: OSHA’s Electrical Standard (29 CFR 1910 Subpart S) includes requirements for electrical equipment used in areas where combustible dust may be present. It addresses measures to prevent ignition sources and the potential for electrical hazards in dust collection systems.
  6. Machine Guarding: OSHA’s Machine Guarding Standard (29 CFR 1910.212) establishes requirements for safeguarding machinery to protect workers from moving parts, including dust collection equipment. It ensures that appropriate guards are in place to prevent employee contact with hazardous machinery.
  7. Combustible Dust: Although OSHA does not have a specific standard solely dedicated to combustible dust, they have issued guidelines and directives related to combustible dust hazards. OSHA’s Combustible Dust NEP (National Emphasis Program) provides guidance for inspecting facilities that handle combustible dust, emphasizing compliance with existing standards and the identification of potential hazards. See below for more information on combustible dust requirements.

It is important to note that OSHA requirements may vary depending on specific industry and location. Consult your relevant OSHA standard and your local EH&S professional to ensure compliance with all applicable regulations.

OSHA’s Combustible Dust National Emphasis Program (NEP)

OSHA’s NEP program is a directive aimed at addressing the unique hazards associated with combustible dust in various industries. The NEP provides guidance to OSHA compliance officers regarding the inspection, enforcement, and compliance activities related to facilities that handle combustible dust materials. The program aims to increase awareness, promote compliance with existing OSHA standards, and reduce the risk of dust-related incidents including fires and explosions.

The most critical Requirements of the NEP include:

  1. Inspections: OSHA compliance officers conduct inspections of facilities that handle combustible dust. These inspections focus on identifying potential dust hazards, evaluating compliance with applicable standards, and determining the effectiveness of dust control measures.
  2. Employee Training: Employers are required to provide adequate training to employees regarding the hazards of combustible dust, safe work practices, and emergency response procedures. Training should cover topics such as dust control measures, housekeeping practices, proper equipment operation, and the use of personal protective equipment (PPE).
  3. Hazard Assessment: Facilities must conduct a thorough hazard assessment to identify potential sources of combustible dust, assess the severity of the hazard, and implement appropriate control measures. This assessment should consider factors such as dust generation, accumulation, dispersion, and ignition sources.
  4. Housekeeping Practices: Proper housekeeping practices play a critical role in controlling combustible dust hazards. Facilities must establish regular cleaning procedures to minimize the accumulation of dust on surfaces, equipment, and ventilation systems. Vacuuming, sweeping, and other methods should be employed to prevent excessive dust buildup.
  5. Ignition Source Control: Facilities must implement measures to control potential ignition sources that could ignite combustible dust. This includes proper electrical equipment selection and installation, grounding and bonding procedures, and isolation of ignition sources from dust-handling areas.
  6. Engineering Controls: Employers are required to assess and implement appropriate engineering controls to minimize the risk of dust explosions. This may include the installation of explosion venting, deflagration suppression systems, spark detection systems, and deflagration venting ductwork.
  7. Written Programs: Facilities must develop and maintain written programs that address combustible dust hazards, including procedures for dust control, equipment maintenance, inspections, employee training, incident reporting, and emergency response.

Understanding Combustible Dust Hazards

Combustible dust hazards pose a significant risk where fine particles of solid materials can become suspended in the air and create a potentially explosive atmosphere. Understanding the nature of these hazards is crucial for maintaining a safe working environment and implementing effective control measures. Combustible dust can arise from a wide range of materials, including organic substances like wood, grain, and food products, as well as inorganic materials such as metals, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals.

OSHA dust combustion pentagon

OSHA’s Dust Combustion Pentagon

The hazard potential of combustible dust arises when several factors, commonly known as the Dust Explosion Pentagon, come together. These factors include the presence of:

  1. Combustible dust particles
  2. An ignition source
  3. Oxygen in the air
  4. Dispersion of dust particles
  5. Confinement of the dust cloud.

When these elements combine in the right proportions, they create a potentially explosive environment. Ignition sources can range from sparks, open flames, hot surfaces, electrical equipment, friction, or static electricity.

To mitigate combustible dust hazards, several preventive measures should be implemented:

  • Effective housekeeping practices are essential to minimize dust accumulation on surfaces, equipment, and ventilation systems, as excessive dust buildup increases the risk of ignition. Regular cleaning, including vacuuming and sweeping with appropriate equipment, can help control dust levels and prevent potential incidents.
  • Proper ventilation systems should be installed to control dust dispersion and maintain a safe working environment.
  • Potential ignition sources, such as electrical equipment, must be properly designed, installed, and maintained to minimize the risk of igniting combustible dust.
  • Explosion protection measures, such as explosion venting or suppression systems, can help mitigate the severity of explosions if they do occur.

Understanding combustible dust hazards is essential for identifying potential risks and implementing appropriate control measures. By conducting thorough dust hazard assessments (see below), implementing effective housekeeping practices, controlling ignition sources, and employing engineering controls, employers can significantly reduce the risk of dust-related incidents as well as fines and violations,  and ensure the safety of their workers and facilities.

National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standards

The NFPA (link to NFPA site) is a non-profit organization dedicated to eliminating death, injury, property, and economic loss due to fire, electrical, and related hazards. You should familiarize yourself with all requirements applicable to your site, but here are the most commonly referenced NFPA standards related to dust collection and control:

  1. NFPA 654: Standard for the Prevention of Fire and Dust Explosions from the Manufacturing, Processing, and Handling of Combustible Particulate Solids: NFPA 654 provides guidelines for preventing fire and dust explosions in facilities that handle combustible particulate solids. It covers various aspects of dust control, including hazard identification, assessment, and mitigation measures. The standard emphasizes the importance of conducting a Dust Hazard Analysis (DHA) to identify potential hazards, implementing effective housekeeping practices, and using appropriate explosion protection systems.
  2. NFPA 68: Standard on Explosion Protection by Deflagration Venting: NFPA 68 focuses on the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of deflagration venting systems. It provides guidelines for venting combustible dust explosions to minimize damage and protect personnel and equipment. The standard outlines requirements for calculating vent areas, selecting venting devices, and establishing proper vent duct designs.
  3. NFPA 69: Standard on Explosion Prevention Systems: NFPA 69 addresses explosion prevention systems used to protect industrial processes and equipment. It covers various protection methods, including deflagration venting, flameless venting, explosion suppression, and explosion isolation. The standard provides requirements for designing and installing these systems to mitigate the risk of dust explosions.
  4. NFPA 70: National Electrical Code (NEC): While not specific to dust collection, the NEC provides guidelines for electrical installations, including those in areas where combustible dust may be present. It covers proper electrical equipment selection, wiring methods, grounding, and bonding to prevent ignition sources in dust-handling environments.
  5. NFPA 91: Standard for Exhaust Systems for Air Conveying of Vapors, Gases, Mists, and Noncombustible Particulate Solids: NFPA 91 focuses on exhaust systems used to convey air, vapors, gases, mists, and noncombustible particulate solids. While primarily addressing general ventilation systems, it includes provisions for dust collection systems, including requirements for ductwork, air velocity, explosion venting, and spark detection systems.
  6. NFPA 664: Standard for the Prevention of Fires and Explosions in Wood Processing and Woodworking Facilities: This standard is applicable to wood shops and wood processing facilities.

These are just a few of the many NFPA standards related to dust collection and control. Consult the specific NFPA standards applicable to your industry and operations to ensure compliance with best practices and industry guidelines for preventing dust-related hazards.

Contact us to consult with a baghouse expert and receive guidance on how to comply with NFPA requirements.

Dust Hazard Analysis (DHA): Identifying and Mitigating Risks

NFPA 652 (Standard on the Fundamentals of Combustible Dust) provides details on conducting a DHA in accordance with the NFPA requirements. However, hear is a summary of the process:

  1. Scope and Team Formation: Determine the scope of the DHA, identifying the areas, processes, and materials to be included in the analysis. Form a multidisciplinary team that includes individuals with expertise in engineering, safety, operations, and maintenance.
  2. Hazard Identification: Identify potential sources of combustible dust and assess the likelihood and severity of a dust explosion or fire. This includes reviewing material safety data sheets (MSDS), conducting facility walkthroughs, and analyzing historical incident data.
  3. Dust Hazard Assessment: Evaluate the characteristics of the dust, such as particle size, particle shape, combustibility, and explosibility. Consider the dust’s ignition sensitivity, explosion severity, and any potential secondary hazards. Assess the effectiveness of existing control measures and housekeeping practices.
  4. Risk Evaluation: Determine the level of risk associated with identified hazards. Evaluate the likelihood and potential consequences of a dust-related incident, considering factors such as ignition sources, dust concentrations, ventilation systems, and equipment design.
  5. Control Measures and Recommendations: Develop recommendations to mitigate identified hazards and reduce the risk of dust explosions or fires. This may include implementing engineering controls, such as improved ventilation or explosion protection systems, enhancing housekeeping practices, modifying equipment or processes, or providing training and personal protective equipment (PPE) for employees.
  6. Documentation and Review: Document the findings, recommendations, and actions taken during the DHA process. Maintain clear records of the assessment, including the scope, team members, hazard identification, risk evaluation, and control measures. Regularly review and update the DHA to reflect any changes in processes, materials, or regulations.
  7. Training and Communication: Ensure that employees and relevant stakeholders are trained on the hazards associated with combustible dust, the control measures in place, and the actions to take in the event of an incident. Promote a culture of safety and provide ongoing communication and education regarding dust hazards and prevention strategies.

Designing Dust Collection Systems for Compliance

It is critical that your dust collector system is designed in accordance with all applicable regulations. We strongly recommend you consult with a dust collection expert before and during your system design and installation to avoid costly rework, mitigation, or safety and health incidents at your site. Here are some general considerations when specifying system requirements or designing a dust collection system:

  1. Identify Applicable Regulations: Understand the specific regulations and standards that apply to your industry and location. This may include Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standards, local building codes, and environmental regulations.
  2. Conduct a Dust Hazard Analysis (DHA): Perform a comprehensive analysis of the dust hazards present in your facility. Identify the types of dust generated, their explosibility characteristics, and potential ignition sources. Use the DHA findings to inform the design of the dust collection system and control measures.
  3. Determine Airflow and Capture Velocity: Calculate the required airflow and capture velocity based on the dust generation rate, size and weight of dust particles, and the proximity of dust sources to the collection hood. Ensure that the system is designed to effectively capture and contain the dust at the source.
  4. Select Proper Collection Equipment: Choose appropriate dust collection equipment that meets regulatory requirements and is suitable for the specific application. Consider factors such as filtration efficiency, dust handling capacity, explosion protection features, and compatibility with the type of dust being collected.
  5. Ensure Adequate Ventilation: Design the ventilation system to maintain a safe and healthy working environment. Provide sufficient air exchange rates, taking into account the size of the facility, the number of dust sources, and the type of operations being conducted. Ventilation should effectively control dust dispersion and maintain breathable air quality.
  6. Implement Explosion Protection Measures: If handling combustible dust, incorporate explosion protection measures as required by regulations. This may include explosion vents, flameless venting, explosion and fire suppression, or deflagration containment systems. Ensure that the design of the dust collection system integrates these measures effectively.
  7. Consider Noise Control: Dust collection systems can generate significant noise levels. Take measures to minimize noise through proper equipment selection, ductwork design, and the use of noise-reducing features like silencers or sound dampening materials.
  8. Provide Easy Maintenance and Access: Design the system with accessibility in mind, allowing for easy maintenance, inspection, and cleaning of components. Incorporate features such as access doors, cleanout ports, and quick-release mechanisms for filters or collection containers.
  9. Labeling and Signage: Ensure that the dust collection system is properly labeled and includes appropriate warning signs to indicate potential hazards, emergency shutdown procedures, and any necessary precautions for personnel.
  10. Documentation and Record Keeping: Maintain thorough documentation of the dust collection system design, including equipment specifications, airflow calculations, hazard analysis reports, maintenance records, and inspection logs. Regularly review and update documentation to ensure compliance with changing regulations.

It is crucial to consult with industry experts, compliance professionals, and relevant regulatory agencies to ensure that your dust collection system design meets all applicable regulatory requirements – YOU are responsible for ensuring that your site is in compliance.

Emissions Monitoring and Reporting Requirements

Emissions requirements are another topic that many industrial professionals need to understand and comply with to avoid fines, mitigation actions, and potential health issues.

  1. Understand Applicable Regulations: Familiarize yourself with the specific regulations and reporting requirements related to dust emissions monitoring in your industry and location. This may include local, state, and federal environmental regulations, air quality standards, and permit conditions. Also review your equipment permits to understand what requirements each piece of equipment is subject to.
  2. Determine Monitoring Frequency: Determine the frequency at which dust emissions monitoring should be conducted based on regulatory requirements and any specific conditions outlined in permits or compliance agreements. This may include continuous monitoring, periodic sampling, or a combination of both.
  3. Select Monitoring Methods: Choose appropriate monitoring methods that are approved and recognized by regulatory authorities. Common methods include stack sampling, opacity monitoring, gravimetric sampling, and real-time particulate matter monitoring. Ensure that the selected methods are suitable for the type of dust being emitted and provide accurate and reliable data.
  4. Establish Monitoring Locations: Determine the appropriate locations for dust emissions monitoring. This may involve identifying critical emission points, such as stacks, vents, or process equipment, where emissions are expected to be generated. Consider factors such as representative sampling, accessibility, and compliance with monitoring requirements.
  5. Calibrate and Maintain Monitoring Equipment: Regularly calibrate and maintain the monitoring equipment to ensure accurate and reliable measurements. Follow manufacturer recommendations and any specific calibration protocols specified by regulatory authorities. Keep detailed records of calibration dates, results, and maintenance activities.
  6. Record and Report Monitoring Data: Maintain comprehensive records of all monitoring data, including measurement dates, locations, sampling methods, and results. Ensure that the records are accurate, well-documented, and readily accessible. Prepare and submit reports in accordance with regulatory requirements, including specified timeframes and data formats.
  7. Compliance with Emission Limits: Regularly compare the monitoring data with the applicable emission limits or standards established by regulatory authorities. Take prompt action if emissions exceed permitted levels, and implement corrective measures to bring emissions back into compliance.
  8. Stay Updated on Changes in Regulations: Stay informed about any changes or updates to regulations related to dust emissions monitoring and reporting. Monitor updates from regulatory agencies and industry organizations to ensure ongoing compliance with the latest requirements.
  9. Retain Records: Retain monitoring records, reports, and documentation for the specified duration as required by regulations. This may vary depending on the jurisdiction, but it is generally advisable to keep records for a minimum of several years to demonstrate compliance and facilitate future audits or inspections.
  10. Seek Professional Guidance: If needed, consult with a professional to ensure compliance with regulations, proper sampling techniques, and accurate reporting.

Compliance Audits and Inspections

Compliance audits and inspections are important processes to ensure that dust collection systems meet regulatory requirements and operate in a safe and environmentally responsible manner. Here is a summary of compliance audits and inspections that dust collection systems could be subject to:

 

  1. Regulatory Compliance Audits: Regulatory agencies such as the OSHA and MSHA may conduct compliance audits to assess whether the dust collection system meets the relevant regulatory requirements. These audits may involve a review of permits, records, operational procedures, maintenance logs, and emissions monitoring data.
  2. Safety Inspections: Safety inspections focus on identifying potential hazards and ensuring that appropriate safety measures are in place. Inspectors may check for proper installation and maintenance of equipment, compliance with electrical and fire safety codes, adherence to lockout/tagout procedures, and the presence of proper safety signage and personal protective equipment. These audits may be conducted by your site EH&S team or by external authorities (your local fire marshal, etc.)
  3. Emissions Testing: Emissions testing is performed to measure the level of pollutants emitted by the dust collection system. This may involve the use of sampling equipment to collect dust samples, which are then analyzed to determine the concentration of specific contaminants. The results are compared against regulatory emission limits to assess compliance. The permits for your equipment may specify your emissions testing requirements.
  4. Operational Audits: Operational audits evaluate the performance and efficiency of the dust collection system. They may include assessing the system’s airflow, pressure drop, filter cleaning efficiency, and energy consumption. These audits aim to identify any operational issues or opportunities for improvement. com conducts thorough audits of your dust collection system equipment.
  5. Internal Audits: In addition to external audits and inspections, organizations may conduct internal audits to assess their own compliance and identify areas for improvement. These audits can be valuable for ensuring that all aspects of the dust collection system are operating effectively and in compliance with internal policies and procedures.

Training and Employee Awareness

Training is a critical component of operating dust collection systems, both to ensure your systems operate efficiently and for ensuring you stay compliant to all environmental, health, and safety requirements. Training should be conducted regularly for your maintenance, operations, engineering, EH&S, and management staff that are involved with dust collection.

Baghouse.com offers a comprehensive training program geared toward educating your entire staff on dust collection principals including system design and selection, operation, maintenance and troubleshooting, special considerations for combustible dust, and other relevant topics. We offer this training both on-site and remotely (via Zoom, etc.) and it can be tailored to your specific site requirements.

Learn more about the training offered by Baghouse.com.

Best Practices for Maintenance and Housekeeping

Specific maintenance and housekeeping practices may vary depending on your situation (if you handle combustible or toxic dust, etc.) but there are some general best practices to ensure your site stays clean and safe when dust is present:

  1. Regular Equipment Inspections: Conduct regular inspections of your dust collection systems to identify any signs of wear, damage, or malfunction. This includes inspecting filters for leaks, ductwork, fans, valves, and other components. Address any issues promptly to maintain system efficiency and prevent potential safety hazards including dust emissions or dust buildup in your system.
  2. Scheduled Maintenance: Establish a daily, weekly, and monthly preventative maintenance schedule for routine tasks such as filter replacement, replacement of pulse valve diaphragms, door seals, fan belts, and other items that wear out. Adhere to manufacturer guidelines and recommendations for maintenance activities to maximize the system’s effectiveness. Contact Baghouse.com for a useful maintenance checklist that you can tailor for your site.
  3. Cleaning Procedures: Develop and implement proper cleaning procedures for the dust collection system and surrounding areas. This includes regular cleaning of ductwork, hoods, and equipment surfaces to prevent dust accumulation and potential hazards. Use approved cleaning methods and equipment that minimize the release of dust into the environment.
  4. Training and Education: Provide comprehensive training to personnel involved in operating and maintaining the dust collection system (see above). Ensure they understand the importance of compliance with environmental, health, and safety regulations, as well as the proper procedures for maintenance, cleaning, and safe handling of materials.
  5. Housekeeping Practices: Implement effective housekeeping practices to minimize the generation and accumulation of dust. This includes regular sweeping, vacuuming, and dampening surfaces to prevent dust from becoming airborne. Dispose of collected dust properly according to applicable regulations. Generally, visible dust in the air or on surfaces in your facility is a sign that housekeeping is needed, or that your system requires inspection and maintenance.
  6. Hazardous Material Handling: If your dust contains hazardous materials, ensure proper handling, storage, and disposal procedures are followed in compliance with relevant regulations. Label containers appropriately, store hazardous materials in designated areas, and work with certified disposal contractors as necessary.
  7. Record-Keeping: Maintain accurate records of maintenance activities, inspections, cleaning schedules, and any incidents or corrective actions taken. These records demonstrate compliance efforts and can be useful during audits or inspections.
  8. Employee Engagement: Foster a culture of environmental, health, and safety awareness among employees. Encourage reporting of any concerns, near misses, or incidents related to the dust collection system. Regularly communicate updates, provide training refreshers, and involve employees in safety committees or initiatives.

Industry-Specific Compliance Considerations

Every industry and site has its own particular considerations for dust collection and control. Here are a few points to consider for some specific industries:

  1. Manufacturing and Industrial Facilities: These facilities often generate dust from processes such as metalworking, woodworking, or chemical manufacturing. Compliance considerations may include proper containment of dust, selection of appropriate dust collection equipment, compliance with hazardous material handling and disposal regulations, and adherence to specific industry standards or guidelines.
  2. Construction Sites: Construction sites can generate dust from activities such as concrete cutting, grinding, and demolition. Compliance considerations may include implementing dust control measures such as wetting down surfaces, using dust collection systems for equipment, proper storage and handling of construction materials, and compliance with local air quality regulations.
  3. Pharmaceutical and Food Processing Industries: These industries require strict adherence to cleanliness and hygiene standards. Compliance considerations may include utilizing dust collection systems designed for sanitary applications, ensuring the use of appropriate filter materials to prevent cross-contamination, compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), and adherence to industry-specific regulations and guidelines.
  4. Mining and Quarrying Operations: Mining and quarrying activities often generate significant amounts of dust. Compliance considerations may include implementing effective dust control measures such as water spraying or dust suppression systems, proper ventilation and exhaust systems, regular monitoring of air quality, and compliance with mining-specific regulations and guidelines. MSHA has specific requirements aimed at preventing and controlling exposure to hazardous levels of respirable dust that cause lung disease, including coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (CWP) or silicosis. MSHA regulates dust collection systems and has a process for equipment approval for use in mining operations, and conduct regular inspections of mining operations.
  5. Energy and Power Generation: Power plants, including coal-fired facilities, face specific compliance considerations for dust collection and control. Compliance measures may include the use of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, compliance with emission limits for particulate matter, proper handling and disposal of fly ash or other byproducts, and adherence to industry-specific regulations and guidelines.

There are multiple government agencies (federal, state, and local) that likely have regulations that apply to your site and your dust collection systems. It is critical that you understand and comply with all regulations to avoid costly fines, mitigation actions, and most importantly, environmental or safety incidents caused by a failure to comply. Baghouse.com has many years of experience working with customers in multiple industries, and provides consulting for customers to help ensure your systems are compliant.

CONTACT US TODAY TO DISCUSS YOUR SYSTEM

For more baghouse related training and information, be sure to check out our Baghouse Online Training page.

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