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Baghouse Malfunction Causes Plant To Tell Workers “Stay Home!”

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A caution sign warning of a danger caused by a malfunctioning Baghouse

Bay Minette, Alabama – A Baghouse fire at a furniture manufacturing plant led to the closure of the entire site for several days. The Bay Minette, Alabama plant operated by Standard Furniture Manufacturing Co. suffered an explosion and ensuing fire in two silos that contain sawdust collected by the plant’s larger dust collection system.

While the exact cause of the explosion, and subsequent fire are not yet known, it is expected that an ignition source (such as a spark or an electric arc) may have been caused during a maintenance procedure.

The 600+ employees of the plant had to remain at home until the Baghouse was repaired and back in operation. This was further delayed when fire inspectors from the local fire department requested that the Baghouse be taken apart to aid them in their investigation of the fire.

This incident, one of many that occur each year, illustrates the importance of a site’s Baghouse, and larger dust collection system to maintaining normal operations. These often overlooked systems can when they malfunction due to maintenance neglect, improper operation, poor design, or other reasons lead to immense immediate costs for plant operators, and even larger long term ones.

Therefore this example highlights the need for constant attention to be given to dust collection systems so as to avoid these expenses, and therefore reduce overall operating costs. Only by maintaining a program of regular Baghouse maintenance, providing operators with sufficient training, ensuring all systems are adequately sized for the facility’s needs and meet all safety standards, can costly incidents like this one be avoided.

 

 
About the Author

| Dominick DalSanto is an Author & Environmental Technologies Expert, specializing in Dust Collection Systems. With nearly a decade of hands-on working experience in the industry, Dominick’s knowledge of the industry goes beyond a mere classroom education. He is currently serving as Online Marketing Director & Content Manager at Baghouse.com. His articles have been published not only on Baghouse.com , but also on other industry related blogs and sites. In his spare time, Dominick writes about travel and life abroad for various travel sites and blogs.

Lack of Baghouse Maintenance Leads to Heavy Fines For Wood Pellet Manufacturer

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Athens, Maine, USA – Violations regarding the operation and maintenance of a Baghouse have led to heavy fines of over $30,000 being imposed to a wood processing plant in Athens, Maine. The fines were issued by the Maine Department of Environmental Protection.

The fines were issued to the plant for violating terms of their state air emissions permit. The plant was found to be operating its Baghouse without having replaced a number of Baghouse Filters that had been damaged/destroyed in a recent fire. The plant also was found to be exceeding limits for particulate matter emissions, due to improper

In addition to issues relating to the dust collection system, the plant also was cited for not maintaining an operational wet-scrubber, maintaining required logs of operating hours, and exceeding the limit for propane usage. They were also cited for failure to report the Baghouse fire indecent that had previously damaged the Baghouse and its filters, and that the wet-scrubber system had experienced a service outage.

The Maine Department of Environmental Protection is the state agency charged with enforcing Maine’s environmental laws.

According to the monthly enforcement report, issued in March 2011,  Maine Woods Pellets will pay the fine in monthly installments after it did not correctly operate its air pollution systems.

 
 
About the Author

| Dominick DalSanto is an Author & Environmental Technologies Expert, specializing in Dust Collection Systems. With nearly a decade of hands-on working experience in the industry, Dominick’s knowledge of the industry goes beyond a mere classroom education. He is currently serving as Online Marketing Director & Content Manager at Baghouse.com. His articles have been published not only on Baghouse.com , but also on other industry related blogs and sites. In his spare time, Dominick writes about travel and life abroad for various travel sites and blogs.

Industrial Air Permits – Overcoming the Difficulties

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By Dominick DalSanto
Environmental Technologies Expert & Author
Baghouse.com

In today’s world increasing public attention is being given to environmental issues. Politicians and lawmakers are following suit by making modifications to existing pollution control legislation. The general consensus is that environmental regulations are going to be getting much tougher in the near future. Even though certain political factions are vehemently opposing many of theses actions, the trend is most assuredly heading towards tighter regulation of emissions.

This is evidenced by recent actions of the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency). Recently the agency issued new regulations regarding the emission of Mercury (Hg) and other heavy metals such arsenic, chromium, and nickel, and acidic gases, including hydrogen chloride (HCl) and hydrogen fluoride (HF), as well as other kinds of particulate matter (PM).

The agency also has assorted that it has authority under the U.S. Clean Air Act to regulate Green House Gases (GHGs) that are believed to be contributing to global warming trends. This will mean that large GHG emission sources will be subject to quotas and be required to acquire emissions permits for GHG emissions. These actions are in line with the current presidential administration’s environmental policy.

These and other developments, while still in their early stages will soon result in increased difficulty obtaining and staying in compliance with air permits. A process that already many in industry describe as overly complex and easy to get lost in. Many have a hard time sorting through the seemingly endless barrage of new and updated regulations. Often only realizing they have failed to meat their requirements after an inspection has taken place, and their facility has been assessed heavy fines.

New Series of Articles Regarding Air Permitting and Compliance

These new standards are particularly applicable to dust collection systems. The new EPA regulations covering particulate matte, along with Mercury and other heavy metals, poses many challenges for plants to reach compliance. Many facilities housing outdated dust collection systems, such as Shaker designs, and use baghouse filters made from older materials that are not as efficient as newer materials such at PTFE membrane. Additionally, due to shrinking maintenance budgets many dust collection systems are in a state of disrepair and as such are operating well below optimal efficiency. These factors will can potentially lead to achieving compliance with new and updated  air permits quite difficult for facility management.

We here at Baghouse.com are now preparing a series of articles to assist facility management with these issues. The new series will present an overview of the air permitting process. It will include case studies that highlight some of the difficulties involved in obtaining, and the implementation of air permits. We will also include helpful information from several consulting firms that work with industrial clients with the permitting process; from obtaining and negotiating air permits, to obtaining and maintaining compliance with them.

Read more about how to overcome unfair and confusing enforcement by regulatory bodies of emissions permits in the next article in the series: Industrial Air Permits & Your Dust Collection System – Unfair and Confusing Enforcement

 

 
About the Author

| Dominick DalSanto is an Author & Environmental Technologies Expert, specializing in Dust Collection Systems. With nearly a decade of hands-on working experience in the industry, Dominick’s knowledge of the industry goes beyond a mere classroom education. He is currently serving as Online Marketing Director & Content Manager at Baghouse.com. His articles have been published not only on Baghouse.com , but also on other industry related blogs and sites. In his spare time, Dominick writes about travel and life abroad for various travel sites and blogs.

Would We Have Clean Air Without Governmental Regulation?

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U.S. Environmental Legislation has come under attack from many different groups recently

Editorial By Dominick DalSanto
Environmental Technologies Expert & Author
Baghouse.com

With recent battles on Capital Hill in Washington D.C. regarding the EPA’s (Environmental Protection Agency) increasing impact on the nation’s economy, many questions are being raised as to the effectiveness of governments having a active role in environmental affairs.

One particularly interesting, and controversial question that has been raised by some is: What would our world’s air quality be without governmental environmental regulation?

Opponents of tougher emissions regulations, and environmental regulations in general, are beginning to question whether government agencies like the EPA are really needed at all.

Conservatives Weigh in on EPA Claims

Recently a conservative think tank organization named the Heritage Foundation, released a report claiming that had the U.S. Clean Air Act never been passed by the U.S. Congress in 1970, industry itself would eventually have taken steps to correct the nation’s growing environmental problems, in part due to technological advancements, and corporate ethics.

A direct quote from the report states:

It is simply preposterous to assume that air quality would worsen unabated over the course of 30 years in the absence of a particular statute. History has proven otherwise, of course. Long before the original CAA [Clean Air Act] was enacted in 1963, industrial emissions were declining as a result of technological advances and efficiency improvements. And both factors, as well as others, will continue to drive environmental improvements regardless of regulation

The paper also claims that by 1970, emissions were already declining on their own, before the first governmental clean air legislation came into effect. This they claim proves that the EPA and similar governmental regulatory bodies similar to it, are not necessary. They claim they only hurt industry and therefore the economies of their respective nations, by requiring new technologies to be installed, and issuing fines for violations.

Additionally, the Heritage Foundation claims that the estimates found in the EPA’s report to Congress are grossly inaccurate, lack any reasonable way to verify its claims, and even admits that its statistics and figures cannot be verified.

The EPA report states that in 2010 the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 resulted in approximately $1.3 trillion in public health and environmental benefits, for a cost of only $50 billion. That’s a value worth more than 9% of GDP, for a cost of only .4% of GDP. And that in 2020  that figure will increase to approximately $2 trillion in benefits, at a cost of $65 billion. That’s a value worth more than 14% of today’s GDP, for an expenditure of only .46%. The ratio of benefits to cost is more than 30 to 1.

 

Environmentalists Strike Back

Air Pollution Trends and rates over the course of the last hundred years

Proponents of the Clean Air Act, and similar environmental regulations, point to air pollution rates such as shown here, to prove that the CCA has succeeded in reducing air pollution since then 1970s.

In short order, dozens of environmentalist organizations, and activists have attacked the conclusions of the Heritage Foundations report. One such article from Switchboard.nrdc.org which is the staff blog of the Natural Resources Defense Council, a leading environmental activist organization, alleges that the Heritage Foundations accusations are completely baseless. They counter that the conclusions of the Heritage Foundation are contradictory in nature, and the product of the industrial sector and right-wing political agenda.

For example the Heritage Foundation article comments that it believes that the EPA estimates are incorrect because the claims made in the report allegedly can not be corroborated. The NRDC article counters that the EPA report is in fact the product of extensive peer-review, and that the Heritage Foundation article’s only source is “a report from one non peer-reviewed study by the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, a free market think tank that, according to IRS data, is funded almost exclusively by corporate and conservative foundations (e.g. oil giants ExxonMobil and the Koch brothers). When asked by Detroit’s Metro Times in 1996 on funding sources, the Center’s President Lawrence Reed said: “Our funding sources are primarily foundations … with the rest coming from corporations and individuals,” but that “… revealing our contributors would be a tremendous diversion…”

Are Emissions Regulations Really Required?

The facts are undeniable that with stricter environmental/emissions standards has come cleaner air for all. To try and say that these regulations are not needed, and that companies, and industry in general will act to reduce the environmental damage they are inflicting on our earth is simply willful blindness. That conclusion ignores a fundamental truth about business and human nature in general; namely that profits come first, every time.

This is not meant to imply that seeking profits first is inherently unethical in some way. In fact the point of any business venture is to gain profit. Nor does this mean that there are not companies that do place a high value on environmental responsibility. Neither does it mean that governmental regulation and legislation are without flaws, or that they are only force that is working towards reducing pollution. However, even in today’s world with increasing attention being given to environmental issues by the public at large, the largest motivating factor for industry in general to reduce its environmental footprint remains the financial benefit.

For us in the dust collection industry, this means that sales efforts always need to remain focused on presenting how our dust collectors, Baghouses, and other pollution control technologies will result in savings/increased profits for the customer.

 

Sources:

http://www.heritage.org/government-regulation/report/coming-clean-regulatory-costs-and-benefits#_ftn1

http://switchboard.nrdc.org/blogs/ljohnson/the_heritage_foundations_criti_1.html

 

What Do You Think?

We would love to hear your comments on this subject. Please leave your comments below, and share in the discussion.

 

 
About the Author

| Dominick DalSanto is an Author & Environmental Technologies Expert, specializing in Dust Collection Systems. With nearly a decade of hands-on working experience in the industry, Dominick’s knowledge of the industry goes beyond a mere classroom education. He is currently serving as Online Marketing Director & Content Manager at Baghouse.com. His articles have been published not only on Baghouse.com , but also on other industry related blogs and sites. In his spare time, Dominick writes about travel and life abroad for various travel sites and blogs.

Biomass Power Plants Fined $835,000 For Excess Particulate Matter Emissions

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By Dominick DalSanto
Environmental Technologies Expert & Author
Baghouse.com

Two Biomass power plants in California’s central valley were fined $835,000 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for exceeding emission limits of nitrogen oxides (which lead to the formation of Ozone), and fine particulate matter. Ampersand Chowchilla Biomass, LLC, (ACB), and Merced Power, LLC, (MP), are located within 12 miles of each other in California’s San Joaquin Valley. An additional fine of $15,000 was issued to ACB by the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District for violation of a district only statute.

The two plants which began operating in 2008 after nearly 2 years of refurbishments, are additionally required to install new pollution control technologies, and monitoring systems. As a result of this action, the plants have installed equipment that will reduce nitrogen oxide emissions by up to 180 tons per year, and carbon monoxide by up to 365 tons per year. The EPA and The District have placed the plants under supervision for the next years years to ensure compliance.

Failure to maintain a fully functionally dust collection system often leads to heavy governmental fines, and sanctions. In the end, the cost of properly maintaining your dust collection system is much lower than the costs associated with operating a faulty, inefficient, and inadequate system.

This action is part of the EPA’s larger efforts for improve the air quality across the nation, specifically in some of the nations largest urban areas. The San Joaquin Valley suffers from one of the worst air quality situations in the country. With heavy industry, a strong reliance on personal automobiles (lack of public transportation), and geographical characteristics all combining to create large amounts of smog, ozone and particulate matter pollution. The area often consistently exceeds national health standards for ozone and particulate matter.

“EPA is committed to doing our part to tackle the worst air quality in the nation. Today’s enforcement actions are a victory for human health,” said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “San Joaquin Valley communities can now breathe easier as a result of the significant pollution controls won in these settlements.”

Nitrogen oxides react with other chemicals to form ozone and small particles, both harmful to the public’s health. Ozone and particulate matter affect the human respiratory system, and are linked to a variety of significant health problems ranging from aggravated asthma to premature death in people with heart and lung disease.

Biomass power plants use green waste from farms and other operations that would otherwise be subject to open burning, and construction debris that might have gone to a landfill, to generate power. A key piece of equipment needed to control emissions from this process, is an suitable dust collection system. As this case demonstrates, failure to maintain a fully functionally dust collection system often leads to heavy governmental fines, and sanctions. In the end, the cost of properly maintaining your dust collection system is much lower than the costs associated with operating a faulty, inefficient, and inadequate system.

After refurbishing the plants in 2007-2008, ACB and MP initiated operations in 2008. A joint investigation by the EPA and District found that ACB and MP violated the air permits issued to them by the District by:

· Emitting air pollutants including nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide in excess of the permit limits;

· Failing to perform timely source testing to measure emissions of various air pollutants;

· Failing to properly install and operate emissions control systems for nitrogen oxides, a precursor to ozone; and

· Failing to certify the continuous emissions monitoring systems.

The plants also violated various District rules including requirements for emissions control plans.

Do you know of any real-life examples where plants chose not to invest in a adequate dust collection system (or failed to maintain it properly, install a larger system to keep up with production needs, etc…) and in the end it ended up costing them much more later on? If you do, we would love to hear from you in the comments section below.

 

 
About the Author

| Dominick DalSanto is an Author & Environmental Technologies Expert, specializing in Dust Collection Systems. With nearly a decade of hands-on working experience in the industry, Dominick’s knowledge of the industry goes beyond a mere classroom education. He is currently serving as Online Marketing Director & Content Manager at Baghouse.com. His articles have been published not only on Baghouse.com , but also on other industry related blogs and sites. In his spare time, Dominick writes about travel and life abroad for various travel sites and blogs.

Dust Collector Troubleshooting Guide

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Introduction to Dust Collector Troubleshooting

Operating and maintaining an equipment system as complex as an Industrial Dust Collector can be a challenge. Here at Baghouse.com we pride ourselves on being experts in our field, with decades of experience designing, installing, maintaining and servicing every kind of Dust Collect design available. We have prepared this short troubleshooting guide in order to help you solve some of the more commonly encountered issues involving Dust Collectors.

Table of Contents

  1. Blower (Fan) & Ductwork Issues
  2. Common Baghouse Issues (All Designs: Shaker, Reverse Air, & Pulse Jet)
  3. Baghouse Design Specific Problems
    1. Shaker
    2. Reverse-Air
    3. Plenum Pulse-Jet
    4. Pulse-Jet

Blower (Fan) & Ductwork Issues

Many Baghouse difficulties originate as problems with the main Blower, or Fan and the supply and exhaust Ductwork.

Problem: Insufficient Airflow Rate coming from the Blower, or Ductwork System

  • Is your Blower (System Fan) powering on and operating properly?
  • Action: Check electrical connections and turn on the Blower.

Addition Questions

  • Is the motor pulling the specified proper amount of Amps?
  • Action: Check wiring
  • Is the fan turning in the right direction?
  • Action: Make sure that motor leads are attached to the proper terminals.
  • Is there excessive vibration?
  • Action: Ensure that there is no excess build up of material on the fan blade, or Blower housing.

Are you getting the proper amount of Air Flow (Cubic Feet per Min) from the Blower?

  • Is the Fan Dampener Open?
  • Action: Close Dampener.
  • Is the air volume at fan rated capacity?
  • Action: See Below.
  • (If your Blower output is normal) Has the Ductwork System been inspected for obstructions, leaks or design flaws that increase static resistance?
  • Action: Redesign Ductwork System to have lower resistance.

Addition Questions

  • Are there elbows, or other directional changing Ductwork immediately preceding the Blower Inlet?
  • Action: Redesign Ductwork to remove any Elbows, or similar configurations near the Blower.
  • Is there an obstruction near the outlet of the Ductwork?
  • Action: Removed any obstruction and try again.

Problem: Excessive Airflow Rate

  • Is the Blower set to the proper speed?
  • Action: Check setting and adjust.
  • Is the Ductwork System oversized?
  • Action: Evaluate the Ductwork System and consider redesigning if needed.
  • Are there any access ports on the Ductwork that are open?
  • Action: Close all ports, and ensure they are sealed properly.

Problem: You have High Static Pressure and a low Airflow Rate

  • Are there any obstructions in the Ductwork System?
  • Action: See above
  • Is the Ductwork System to restrictive?
  • Action: See above

Common Baghouse (All Designs: Shaker, Reverse Air, & Pulse Jet) Issues

Many of these issues can be resolved with a simple maintenance procedure; others may require a qualified service technician to implement a solution a particular problem.

Problem: There is a higher than anticipated Pressure Drop in the Baghouse

  • Have all gauges and pressures sensors been checked for accuracy?
  • Action: Clean all pressure taps, check houses for leaks, for proper fluid level in Manometer, and diaphragm in gauge.
  • Is the Baghouse the undersized for the application?
  • Action: Consider upgrading to a larger unit.
  • Is the cleaning mechanism adjusted to the proper settings?

Addition Questions

  • Is the cleaning timer working properly?
  • Action: Reset the timer. Check wiring, and replace if needed.
  • Is the dust not able to be removed from the Filter Bags by the cleaning mechanism?
  • Action: Check for condensation on Bags. Dry clean bags, or replace them. Take dust samples and send them to the manufacturer for analysis.
  • Is there excessive reentrainment of dust on the Filter Bags?
  • Action: Empty Hopper continuously.

Problem: Dirty discharge at stack

  • Are the Bags leaking from either the clamps, or are from being too porous?
  • Action: Replace Bags, isolate leaking compartment or module. Allow sufficient filter cake to form. Check and tighten clamps. Change to a different Filter Bag; smooth out Bag before clamping.
  • Are the seals between the different compartments  (Dirty Air, and Clean Air Compartments) of the Baghouse leaking?
  • Action: Repair by caulking or welding seams.

Problem: Moisture in the Baghouse

  • Is the Baghouse temperature below the dew point?
  • Action: Raise gas temperature; insulate unit.

Additional Questions

  • Are there any cold spots where pipes or other components connect?
  • Action: Eliminate direct metal line through insulation.
  • Has the Baghouse been sufficiently preheated (Certain applications only)?
  • Action: Run system with hot air only before process gas is introduced.
  • Is the system purged properly after each shutdown?
  • Action: Run fan for an additional 10 min after processing is shut down.

Problem: Material is bridging in the Hopper, thus preventing proper operating of the Baghouse

  • Is there excess moisture in the Baghouse?
  • Action: (See previous solutions)
  • Does the Hopper retain too much material, or is it cleaned on a regular basis?
  • Action: Clean Hopper on a regular schedule.
  • Is the Hopper slope sufficient to allow for the collected material to fall?
  • Action: Redesign and replace.
  • Is the opening for the Screw Conveyor (Or similar device) of adequate size?
  • Action: Redesign and replace.

Problem: The Bags fail prematurely, or wear or faster than they should

  • Is the Baffle Plate worn out?
  • Action: Replace with a new Baffle Plate; Determine whether the Gas stream is striking the Baffle Plate correctly, if it is not, consult with the manufacturer, redesign and replace.
  • Is the dust load to high for the particular Baghouse, or Bags?
  • Action: Install a Primary Dust Collector (Pre-Filter) to reduce dust loads to the Baghouse.
  • Are the Bags being cleaned at the proper intervals?
  • Action: Clean less often.

Baghouse Design Specific Problems

The most common variations in Baghouse design regard the cleaning mechanism.  The three most common are Shaker, Reverse Air, & Pulse Jet. While the proceeding information applies to all Baghouse designs, the following covers specific design related problems.

Shaker Baghouse Type Specific Issues

Problem: Cleaning Mechanism Does Not Function Properly

  • Does Shaking action take place, as it should?
  • Action: Check pins, Keys, Bearings, Etc and repair if necessary.
  • Is the Shaking action strong enough?
  • Action: Increase Shaking rate.
  • Have the Filter Bags been checked to have proper tension?
  • Action: Tension Bags to proper rate.
  • Are any other Baghouse functions affected when Shaking process begins (Fan, or Isolation Dampener, etc)?
  • Action: Repair Isolation Damper, or stop Fan.
  • Are the different compartmental isolation dampener valves functioning properly?
  • Action: Check linkage, Valve Seals, and Air supply of the Pneumatic Operators.
  • Is the cleaning cycle set to the proper interval?
  • Action: Set to the shortest interval possible between compartments.
  • Is the Air to Cloth Ratio at least 3:1?
  • Action: Add Bags; Consider installing a larger unit.

Problem: Filter Bags fail prematurely

  • Is the shaking mechanism set too high?
  • Action: Slow down shaking mechanism.

Reverse Air Baghouse Type Specific Issues

Problem: Cleaning Mechanism Does Not Function Properly

  • Are the different compartmental Isolation Dampener valves functioning properly?
  • Action: Repair if necessary.
  • Do the Bags have the proper amount of tension?
  • Action: See above.
  • Is the Reverse Air Fan powering up/running properly?
  • Action: Run Fan and check differential pressure.
  • Does the Reverse Air Fan spin in the correct direction?
  • Action: See section:  Blower (Fan) & Ductwork Issues
  • Is the Air to Cloth Ratio at least 3:1?
  • Action: Consider acquiring a larger Baghouse.

Plenum Pulse Jet Baghouse Type Specific Issues

Problem: Cleaning Mechanism Does Not Function Properly

  • Is the air pressure at the Pulse Valves within the recommended levels and are all Solenoids and Diaphragms operating properly?
  • Action: Check for leaking solenoids and pulse valves; check compressed air source and check differential pressure.
  • Are the cleaning pulses at set to the correct duration (0.1 sec)?
  • Action: Reset to 0.1 sec.
  • Is cleaning interval at the lowest setting the will allow air manifold pressure to rebuild?
  • Action: Change setting, and check the differential pressure.
  • Do all poppet valves seal properly?
  • Action: Adjust and/or repair all valves and check differential pressure.
  • Is the Air to Cloth Ratio at least 4:1?
  • Action: Switch to pleated media; Consider installing a larger unit.

Pulse Jet Baghouse Type Specific Issues

Problem: Cleaning Mechanism Does Not Function Properly.

  • Is the manifold pressure within the manufacturer’s suggested range?
  • Action: Check for leaks at the solenoids and pulse valves; Check compressed air source and then check differential pressure.
  • Are the cleaning pulses at set to the correct duration (0.1 – .015 sec)?
  • Action: Set to 0.1 – 0.15 duration.
  • Is cleaning interval at the lowest setting the will allow air manifold pressure to rebuild?
  • Action: Change setting and check differential pressure.
  • Is the compressed air pressure at the proper level?
  • Action: Check for leaks; Increase pressure.
  • Is the Air to Cloth Ratio at least 6:1?
  • Action: Switch to pleated media; Consider installing a larger unit.

 

 
About the Author

| Dominick DalSanto is an Author & Environmental Technologies Expert, specializing in Dust Collection Systems. With nearly a decade of hands-on working experience in the industry, Dominick’s knowledge of the industry goes beyond a mere classroom education. He is currently serving as Online Marketing Director & Content Manager at Baghouse.com. His articles have been published not only on Baghouse.com , but also on other industry related blogs and sites. In his spare time, Dominick writes about travel and life abroad for various travel sites and blogs.

How to Choose the Correct Baghouse Filter

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Often our customers find it difficult to determine exactly what kind of Filter Media they require for their specific Dust collection system. Other times they know the particular type of filter media they need, but are unable to determine the exact size they need for their Baghouse.

To assist our customers, we at Baghouse.com have prepared this article to help you select the right filter media to match your specific needs.

If you would like to speak directly with one of our dust collection experts for additional help in selecting your Filter Media, or if you would like to receive a free Baghouse Filters quote, please call us at  800 351 6200 or Contact Us using our online form.

 

Step 1 – Filter Media Selection

Choose the media from which your filter bags will be constructed of based on the type of application they will be used for. Take the following things into consideration prior to selecting your filter media:

•    Temperature – Do your bags need to withstand extreme temperatures?
•    Material – What is the filter being used for?
•    Chemistry – Can your filter withstand the chemical makeup of the dust particles
•    Resistance- Is the filter media able to resist the abrasion of the dust particles

Choosing the correct filter media is an important and sometimes difficult process. To assist you in the identification of the right media for your bags, keep the following in mind: Filter bag performance is directly related to how well it can tolerate the environment in which it is being used. How efficiently it can remove the dust particles from its fabric and its ability to be cleaned by the dust collector is also important. You must first learn to identify the type of filter media currently used in your application. Below you will find a list of typical construction methods:

•    Woven felts
•    Non-woven felts
•    Natural fibers
•    Synthetics (Thermoset or Thermoplastics such as Polypropylene “PPRO” – Polyphenylene sulfide “PPS” – Polyester “PE”)

For additional information on media types please examine our Filter Fabrics Chart below. A simple test to determine if a material is a thermoplastic is to take a small swatch and put a flame to it. A thermoplastic material will begin to melt when exposed to direct heat. The selection criterion eliminates materials based on temperature and chemical characteristics. The first cut is usually made based on temperature. Then the chemical characteristics of the gas stream are considered to further refine the search. Next, the efficiency of the material further dictates the construction of the material such as the weight, oz/sq. ft., fiber and surface treatments/membranes. Last but not least, if there are still two or more candidates it comes down to a price versus performance trade off.

Dust Collector Filter Fabrics

 

Popular Materials

 

Polyester FeltPolyester Felt - Baghouse Filter Fabric

Recommended continuous operation temperature: 275°F
Maximum (short time) operation temperature: 300°F
Supports combustion: Yes
Biological resistance (bacteria, mildew): No Effect
Resistance to alkalis: Fair
Resistance to mineral acids: Fair+
Resistance to organic acids: Fair
Resistance to oxidizing agents: Good
Resistance to organic solvents: Good
Available weights: 10 oz. – 22 oz.

Polypropylene Felt - Dust Collector Filter Fabric

Polypropylene Felt

Polypropylene Felt

Recommended continuous operation temperature: 190°F
Maximum (short time) operation temperature: 210°F
Supports combustion: Yes
Biological resistance (bacteria, mildew): Excellent
Resistance to alkalis: Excellent
Resistance to mineral acids: Excellent
Resistance to organic acids: Excellent
Resistance to oxidizing agents: Good
Resistance to organic solvents: Excellent
Available weights: 12 oz. – 18 oz

 

High Temperature Materials

 

Conex® / Nomex® Felt (Aramid) - Dust Collector Filter Fabric

Conex® / Nomex® Felt (Aramid)

Conex® / Nomex® Felt (Aramid)

Recommended continuous operation temperature: 400°F
Maximum (short time) operation temperature: 425°F
Supports combustion: No
Biological resistance (bacteria, mildew): No Effect
Resistance to alkalis: Good
Resistance to mineral acids: Fair
Resistance to organic acids: Fair+
Resistance to oxidizing agents: Poor
Resistance to organic solvents: Good
Available weights: 10 oz. – 22 oz.

P84® Felt Polyimide - Dust Collector Filter Fabric

P84® Felt Polyimide

P84® Felt Polyimide

Recommended continuous operation temperature: 475°F
Maximum (short time) operation temperature:500°F
Supports combustion: No
Biological resistance (bacteria, mildew): No Effect
Resistance to alkalis: Fair
Resistance to mineral acids: Good+
Resistance to organic acids: Good+
Resistance to oxidizing agents: Good+
Resistance to organic solvents: Excellent
Available weights: 14 oz. – 18 oz.

Ryton® Felt / PPS - Dust Collector Filter Fabric

Ryton® Felt / PPS

Ryton® Felt / PPS

Recommended continuous operation temperature: 375°F
Maximum (short time) operation temperature: 400°F
Supports combustion: No
Biological resistance (bacteria, mildew): No Effect
Resistance to alkalis: Excellent
Resistance to mineral acids: Excellent
Resistance to organic acids: Excellent
Resistance to oxidizing agents: Fair
Resistance to organic solvents: Excellent
Available weights: 16 oz. – 18 oz.

Dust Collector Filter Specialty Materials

 

Homopolymer Acrylic Felt - Dust Collector Filter Fabric

Homopolymer Acrylic Felt

Homopolymer Acrylic Felt

Recommended continuous operation temperature: 250°F
Maximum (short time) operation temperature: 275°F
Supports combustion: Yes
Biological resistance (bacteria, mildew): Good+
Resistance to alkalis: Fair
Resistance to mineral acids: Good+
Resistance to organic acids: Excellent
Resistance to oxidizing agents: Good
Resistance to organic solvents: Good+
Available weights: 15 oz. – 18 oz.

Epitropic Felt Antistatic - Dust Collector Filter Fabric

Epitropic Felt Antistatic

Epitropic Felt Antistatic

Recommended continuous operation temperature: 275°F
Maximum (short time) operation temperature: 300°F
Supports combustion: Yes
Biological resistance (bacteria, mildew): No Effect
Resistance to alkalis: Fair
Resistance to mineral acids: Fair+
Resistance to organic acids: Fair
Resistance to oxidizing agents: Good
Resistance to organic solvents: Good
Available weights: 14 oz. – 16 oz.

Step 2 – Dust Collector Filter Measurements

Accurate measurements lead to the best fit. It’s likely that your dust collector has been modified over the years due to permitting issues or changes in your process which called for a reconfiguration of the Baghouse. In this case OEM configurations will not fit and you will need to obtain accurate measurements for your filters before ordering replacement filter bags. If you currently have filter bags installed that are functioning properly, you can remove one of these bags to get the proper measurements for your replacement order. A spare bag that has not been used yet can also be measured if available. However, be sure to verify the bag measured is the same as the bags currently being used in the dust collector. If you are removing a used bag to measure, please be sure to use all necessary precautionary measures set in place prior to removal i.e. gloves, protective garments and respiratory equipment if needed. It is best not to rely only on the numbers off the unit of OEM filter specifications because of possible changes to the configurations. Of course the best solution is to mail the manufacturer a new or used bag that can be used a guide sample.

Flat Width: Place the filter on a flat surface such as a large table or cement floor. With the filter stretched out, press down on the side. Using a measuring tape, very accurately record the width. Be sure to hold the filter down firmly on an even surface when taking this measurement.

Diameter: When measuring the tube sheet hole of a pulse jet style dust collector, first make sure the hole has not been damaged or warped in any way. Clean the surface thoroughly with a wire brush then using a micrometer, measure the hole in both directions. If the measurements are at all different locate another hold and repeat this process.

Length: Remove the filter from the unit. Preferably with the assistance of another person, stretch the filter out. While maintaining tension on the filter record the length from the longest point at each end using a measuring tape. Do not include and straps, metal caps or other hanging hardware in the measurement, just the length of the filter itself.

Step 3 – Top & Bottom Construction

The top and bottom construction of a filter bag involves a variety of possible configurations. Identifying the type of cleaning process used by your dust collector will help to determine which configuration is needed. The most common types of dust collectors are “Pulse-Jet” “Shaker” “Reverse Air”. The chart below can help you identify which type of dust collector filter you are using.

Filter Configuration Chart

Pulse-Jet Dust Collectors (Reverse jet) – Found in almost every industrial environment. They are the most popular design and are seen in nearly all industry segments. Pulse-Jet Units can be divided into two major groups Top load or bottom load units sometime called top entry (walk-in plenum) or bottom entry (common in bin vents) because of the point of entry used to change out the filters.

Typical filter configuration for a top load unit:
Snap Band Top (double-beaded ring)
Disk Bottom (w/o wear strip)

Typical filter configuration for a bottom load unit:
Raw End Top
Disk Bottom (w/o wear strip)

Shaker Dust Collectors (Mechanical Cleaning) – Usually found in older applications where unscheduled down time is not a major concern.

Typical filter Top Configurations
Loop Top
Grommet Top
Strap or Tail Top
Metal Hanger or Cap

Typical Filter Bottom Configurations
Corded Cuff with Clamp
Snap Band
(Double-Beaded Ring)

Reverse-Air Dust Collectors – Usually found in very large air handling environments such as power generation and cement plants although they do have uses in a variety of industries. Sometimes called a structural bag, these filters usually have a series of support rings spaced every few feet throughout the length of the bag.

Typical Top Configurations
Compression band w/Metal Cap & Hook

Typical Bottom Configurations
Compression band
Snap Band
Cord w/Metal Clamp

Snap Band - Dust Collector Filter Configuration

Snap Band

Raw Edge - Dust Collector Filter Configuration

Raw Edge

Cord - Dust Collector Filter Configuration

Cord

Hanger - Dust Collector Filter Configuration

Hanger

Grommet - Dust Collector Filter Configuration

Grommet

Loop - Dust Collector Filter Configuration

Loop

Strap - Dust Collector Filter Configuration

Strap

Support Ring - Dust Collector Filter Configuration

Support Ring

Rubber O-Ring - Dust Collector Filter Configuration

Rubber O-Ring

Disk - Dust Collector Filter Configuration

Disk

Disk With Wear Strip - Dust Collector Filter Configuration

Disk With Wear Strip

Flange - Dust Collector Filter Configuration

Flange

Hem - Dust Collector Filter Configuration

Hem

Sewn Flat - Dust Collector Filter Configuration

Sewn Flat

Envelope - Dust Collector Filter Configuration

Envelope

Step 4 – Additional Options

Ground Wires – Use to comply with Factory Mutual requirements for static dissipation. Ground wire can be made from stainless steel or copper however this technique only works on a localized area of the filter. For optimal static dissipation look at conductive fiber filter made with Epitropic or Stainless Steel fibers.

Wear Cuffs – Used to combat abrasion at the bottom of the bag either from a sandblasting effect or from bag-to-bag abrasion due to turbulence in the bag house. Usually 2 to 4 inches in length and made of a material similar to that of the body of the filter bag.

Special Finishes – There are many finish options that can be added to the filter media at the time it is manufactured. Please refer to the materials selection area for further details. If you want to order a specific brand or special type of finish please add that request into the additional comments section when ordering.

 

 
About the Author

| Dominick DalSanto is an Author & Environmental Technologies Expert, specializing in Dust Collection Systems. With nearly a decade of hands-on working experience in the industry, Dominick’s knowledge of the industry goes beyond a mere classroom education. He is currently serving as Online Marketing Director & Content Manager at Baghouse.com. His articles have been published not only on Baghouse.com , but also on other industry related blogs and sites. In his spare time, Dominick writes about travel and life abroad for various travel sites and blogs.

EPA Forcing Penn. Four Prisons to Reduce Air Pollution

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PHILADELPHIA (January 4, 2011) – Four Prisons in the State of Pennsylvania have reached a settlement with the Environmental Protection Agency of alleged Clean Air Act violations. The settlement with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Department of Corrections and the Department of General Services, includes provisions that will include new pollution control technology being installed, and  additional reporting requirements at the four correctional facilities in Muncy, Bellefonte, Huntingdon and Somerset, Pa.

“Today’s settlement will improve the air quality in four Pennsylvania communities,” said Shawn M. Garvin, EPA Mid-Atlantic Regional Administrator.  “It’s important that all sources of air emissions, including prisons, comply with environmental regulations to ensure that the standards are met in nearby communities.”

The exact terms of the settle require each location to make improvements to its boiler plants to reduce emissions, including particulate matter, sulfur dioxide and nitrous oxides. These pollutants can cause respiratory problems, exacerbate cases of childhood asthma, and create haze.  Under the agreement, the Department of Corrections will also pay a civil penalty of $300,000.

The specific new improvements that are scheduled to be installed include a new Baghouse (Dust Collector) to reduce particulate matter at the Rockview facility. Other locations will switch from coal-fired boilers to cleaner gas-fired versions. In some locations the new gas-fired boilers will be installed, in others existing equipment will be used in a larger capacity, while phasing out the older coal-fired equipment.

This settlement has reporting obligations to ensure the prisons stay on schedule with the terms of the agreement.  Should the facilities’ boilers fail to meet the requirements, they will be subject to stipulated penalties, ranging from $1,000 to $10,000 per day contingent on the type and length of the violation.

The settlement is subject to a 30-day public comment period and final court approval.

A full list of the proposed changes can be found below:

  • Baghouse to control particulate matter will be installed at the Rockview facility;
  • New gas-fired boiler units at the Laurel Highlands facility will be constructed;
  • Coal-fired boiler units at the Muncy facility will be shut down and replaced by an existing natural gas- fired boiler; and
  • The Huntingdon facility is required to either add particulate matter controls, or convert to gas-fired boiler units.

 

 
About the Author

| Dominick DalSanto is an Author & Environmental Technologies Expert, specializing in Dust Collection Systems. With nearly a decade of hands-on working experience in the industry, Dominick’s knowledge of the industry goes beyond a mere classroom education. He is currently serving as Online Marketing Director & Content Manager at Baghouse.com. His articles have been published not only on Baghouse.com , but also on other industry related blogs and sites. In his spare time, Dominick writes about travel and life abroad for various travel sites and blogs.

5 Ways Dust Collection Affects Our Everyday Life

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By Dominick DalSanto
Environment Expert & Author
Baghouse.com

The term Industrial Dust Collection for many simply draws a blank in their minds. “What is that?” they may say. Or they might simply think that it has something to do with “Big Vacuum Cleaners”. But little do those outside of the industry itself appreciate how many benefits this multimillion dollar industry brings to all of us. Here are just 5 reasons why we should be care about Dust Collection technology and the effects it has on our lives.

1. Dust Collection Protects Human Life

There are literally thousands of industrial processes that create dust pollution, including Steel Mills, Food Processing, Woodworking, Cement Plants, and other Manufacturing.  By capturing harmful particulate matter emitted from these industrial sources, prevent the release of a wide range of dangerous compounds into the atmosphere, thereby preventing human exposure to this harmful material.

2. Dust Collection Protects Our Environment

Since the industrial revolution began almost 200 years ago, mankind’s industrial progress has caused much harm to our planet. By passing contaminated air through a Dust Collector Filter before it is released into the environment, industrial sites can prevent the contamination of water sources, such as rivers lakes and streams, as well as keep our air clean, safe and breathable for animal, plant and human life alike.

3. Proper Dust Collector Systems Help Keep Workers Healthy

Ironworkers from 1930 working on the Empire State Building

One of the greatest dangers facing industrial workers is exposure to contaminated air. Another overlooked danger of large amounts of dust pollution, is the very real threat of a dust explosion occurring. When certain kinds of dusts are dispersed into the air in the right proportions, it can lead to a very violent explosion that can  cause a massive loss of life. Through the operation of a Baghouse (Trade term for a Dust Collector), job site hazards are reduced, and worker safety is increased.

4.  Dust Control Helps Keep Manufacturing Costs Down, Leading To Cheaper Products For You

With a adequate Dust Control program in place, industry can avoid many costly accidents (Such as Dust Explosions) and attain a higher quality product.

5. Countless Products Could Not Be Manufactured With It

Many industrial processes are only possible through the application of Dust Collection/Separation and related technology. These include most forms of Food Production, Metal Processing, Pharmaceutical Manufacturing and more.

Yes our industry, which may at times to the public seem to be irrelevant, is in fact one of the most vital industrial processes we have in our modern industrial era.

What other ways does the Dust Collection Industry benefit society?

This list is by no means exhaustive, no does it claim to be. We would like to hear from you. Please leave your comments below.

 

 
About the Author

| Dominick DalSanto is an Author & Environmental Technologies Expert, specializing in Dust Collection Systems. With nearly a decade of hands-on working experience in the industry, Dominick’s knowledge of the industry goes beyond a mere classroom education. He is currently serving as Online Marketing Director & Content Manager at Baghouse.com. His articles have been published not only on Baghouse.com , but also on other industry related blogs and sites. In his spare time, Dominick writes about travel and life abroad for various travel sites and blogs.