Depending on one’s place of employment, the particles that can be found in dust often contain harmful materials that can result in dangerous situations, some of these situations being fatal. Since these hazardous conditions can be hard to detect with the human eye, many companies are now employing real-time monitors that have the ability to detect any harmful particles so that they are addressed before it develops into a bigger issue where someone is potentially put in harm’s way.

Key Takeaways:

  • The new Trolex dust monitor beats conventional dust monitors, which are designed to measure a single size particulate at a time.
  • With its new, cutting-edge laser technology, the Trolex dust monitor can monitor multiple sizes at once.
  • The new Trolex Air XD is also cost-effective, as it requires less routine maintenance, which brings down the overall cost of ownership.

“The real-time application also allows companies to use live data to identify specific trends and peak levels of risk.”

Read more: https://www.shponline.co.uk/occupational-health/real-time-dust-monitor-launched/

Gas Plant Explosion

In July of 2016, the mismanagement of a heat exchanger led to an extensive series of explosions that resulted in damaging forest fires in Mississippi. The mismanagement was a result of Enterprise Products Pascagoula Gas Plant allowing the equipment to experience too much thermal fatigue. If there had been more extensive safety measures and inspection protocols set in place, these disastrous results may not have occurred, saving a plethora of vegetation and clean up funds.

Key Takeaways:

    • As regards a Mississippi gas leak explosion, a February 12 report points to thermal fatigue as the culprit.
    • Thermal fatigue refers to the weakening of materials over time, due to the stress of heating and cooling.
    • Upon inspection, it was clear that small cracks had arisen over time, due to temperature fluctuations.

“The plant – which had repaired four heat exchangers nine times in 17 years, CSB found – was shut down for nearly six months.”

Read more: https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/18103-safety-gaps-led-to-explosions-at-mississippi-gas-plant-csb